CLA Connect Open Forum

How many Turns on Weekend?

  • 1.  How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 13 days ago

    So how busy can you reasonably get on a weekend before customers are bouncing off each other and going to another mat because they cant get a machine when they want it?  8, 10, 12 turns???  Assume 24 hour unattended location.  Any real world insight would be very helpful as I try and do a gut check on my proforma on a mat I would like to build. 

    For example, if an typical mat averages 3.0 turns per day for the week, and assuming 60% of volume is done on Sat & Sun then that would mean they are averaging 6.3 turns on Sat & Sun (see table below).  I am trying to back into my weekly average turns by figuring out how many turns I can reasonable expect on a busy weekend.

    Turns per day on Sat & Sun
    Weekly Avg Turns Per Day
    1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0
    Sat/Sun % of sales 30% 1.1 2.1 3.2 4.2 5.3 6.3 7.4 8.4
    40% 1.4 2.8 4.2 5.6 7.0 8.4 9.8 11.2
    50% 1.8 3.5 5.3 7.0 8.8 10.5 12.3 14.0
    60% 2.1 4.2 6.3 8.4 10.5 12.6 14.7 16.8
    70% 2.5 4.9 7.4 9.8 12.3 14.7 17.2 19.6
    80% 2.8 5.6 8.4 11.2 14.0 16.8 19.6 22.4


    ------------------------------
    Greg Smith
    Potential Investor
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 13 days ago
    Just because you build it, doesn't mean that they will come.  You may not get 3 turns per day on every machine.  The ends get used more than the middle, as well as the top pockets.  Not sure that anyone collects on Friday night and Monday morning just to figure out the weekend TPD.  Card owners can provide this type of data.  Many coin owners divide a group of washers by the number of days since last collection to get our average, and many do not even bother.  There is no such thing as a typical mat.  Every location is unique.  3 TPD is just a number that we give to the finance companies to make them feel good.

    ------------------------------
    Chris Mallam
    Norfolk VA
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  • 3.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 13 days ago
    Yeah ^^^ makes a valid point.  The assumptions are great but they're just that.

     Better question is what strategy you plan to implement in order to attract the customers.  They're all doing laundry somewhere else.


    ------------------------------
    Juan
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Cocoa FL
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    I created a spreadsheet in excel, divided up my machines by type, and figure pretty accurately what my TPD are.  I do not go into detail like, by day, or weekday vs. weekend.  I collect coin 2-3x a week, and count once a week.

    Each machine type has a different TPD.  I can confirm that the end machines get used more than the middle machines, but I only know this because the change drawers on the outside machines are more full than the inside machines.  I don't count coin by machine individually.

    It's not complicated to back into the TPD, but it does require effort to manage and you have to count your coins as they come out of machine types.  If I had any bigger of a store, I would not go through this effort.  My store is pretty small, I only have like 20 washers.

    My TPD on a weekly average, range between 2.2 - 5, depending on which type of washer we're talking about.  All my dryers combined average around 4 TPD.  Again, this is a weekly average.  I know I'm busier on weekends, but it would be way too time consuming to count twice, and I don't think I would get much out of the effort.

    ------------------------------
    laurence singer
    Coin counter
    Lincolnwood IL
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    How do you calculate tpd on the dryers?   Not sure I've ever heard of anyone calculating tpd on dryers.  Do you have set number of minutes per set amount of money?

    We just calculate dry as a % of wash revenues.

    ------------------------------
    WEI CHEN
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Los Angeles CA
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  • 6.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    WEI;

    Yes you can, if you use full cycle drying.

    ------------------------------
    Deward Stout
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Hurricane Laundromat & Storage
    Hurricane UT
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 4 days ago

    Hello Greg,

    I am sorry but I did not understand your chart.

    Let me explain why.

    From Monday to Friday your average Turns per Day are 3, so it is a total of 15 on weekdays, and per your example, your wording " and assuming 60% of volume is done on Sat & Sun then that would mean they are averaging 6.3 turns on Sat & Sun (see table below)"

    15 plus 6.3 turns on Saturday plus 6.3 turns on Sunday equal 27.6 turns per week

    27.6 divided by seven days equals ± 3.94 average turns PER DAY on a 7 days week period on all your equipment mix including washers and dryers. Your Total Equipment Mix Average is ± 3.94 TPD

    When we or I should say me, figuring out the AVERAGE turns per day (TPD) of my store and talking about of volume is done on Saturday and Sunday It does not matter that we are talking Turns per Day or Dollars Revenue since one is dependent on the other.

    When we talk about AVERAGES we or I should say me, I am referring to the AVERAGE turns per day my whole equipment mix is doing during a stipulated period of time / days an equal number of days in all the evaluated periods. This is in order to compare apples to apples and not pineapples.

    A good TPD number is a number that allows you to cover all normal operating expenses, pay you for the time you put in and provide a return on investment

    Since your TPDs represent Revenue/Vend price/Number of machines/days, the amount of dollars generated by a TPD number is tough to average out.

    Some laundromats get higher TPD numbers but at low vend prices.  Other laundromats get lower TPD numbers but at high vend prices.  Some laundromats even get high TPD numbers at average washer vend prices but with zero dryer revenue (Free Dry).

    The CLA past surveys said that the Average TPD is between 3.2 to 4.36 a day. They do not specify if are only washing machines or also include dryers

    Let me break down my equipment mix

    6 30 lbs washers

    9 40 lbs washers

    3 60 pounds washers

    5 30 pounds stack dryers – 10 pockets

    4 50 pounds stack dryers – 4 pockets

    These charts are my AVERAGE Turns per hour and per day from 7:30 am to 21:00 pm >13.5 working hours per day> from Sunday to Saturday




    Hello Wei,

     

    If you have customers that already are paying full cycle (30 minutes for one bath, one fast spin, ones extract, one rinse and one final extract) on the wash why not on the dryer. Implement a FULL CYCLE DRYING.

    Wei, you can use this as an example. If you're selling your dryers at a rate of 28 minutes per dollar or $ 0.25 for 7 minutes on a 30 pounds dryer. Which is really a low price today. It's not unreasonable to expect a customer to pay $2.00 to use a 30 pounds stack dryer that cost us well over $ ± 4,500 dollars to buy plus we pay for all maintenance, gas, electricity, cleaning, lint removal, insurance, professional oversight, etc. 

    As I mentioned before It is not unreasonable to expect a customer to pay for a 32 minutes for a FULL CYCLE DRYING divided as follow: -19 minutes burner ON -65%, 10 minutes burner OFF -35% and 3 minutes COOLDOWN- a FULL CYCLE DRYING is half the vending price of similar size-one bath, one rinse, one extract- 30 pounds full cycle wash, that cost us well over $ ± 3,500 for 30 minutes wash cycle at $ 4.00 and 30 pounds dryer, 32 minutes dry cycle at $ 2.00

    To implement this you have to tame your customers about pairing the correct tumble dryer to match the washer-extractor

    1 each 30 pounds dry weight capacity, with 4 cubic feet cylinder volume (Cylinder Diameter 25" and Cylinder Depth 14 1/8") washer paired to 1 each 30 pounds dry weight capacity, with 11.3 cu ft cylinder volume (Cylinder Diameter 30" and Cylinder Depth 27 1/2" according to Dexter T-400 Washer Specifications, And T-30x2 Express Stack Dryer Specifications. The dry weight capacity in both machines are the same 30 pounds BUT the cylinder volume in the dryer is 282.5%bigger to handle the extra 55 to 65% water retention moisture from the washer after the final spin.

    You have to set signs all over your store to teach your clientele about pairing your specific washers and dryers mix and about the capacities and cylinder volumes of each one.

    To calculate the Dryer´s Turns Per day (TPD) by using the price to buy 30 minutes (same as the 30 minutes full cycle wash time, but here you can introduce your own wash cycle minutes time and use the same cycle minutes time for drying in order to compare apples to apples and not to oranges minutes time wise talking or Turns per Day) of dry time rather than the quarter that starts your dryer but accomplishes little actual drying.

    Again as an example, if you are charging $ 0.25 for 7 minutes, so are charging $ 1.07 for 30 minutes ($0.25÷7*30 = $1.07) As a rule of thumb a regular load of mix garments takes about 30 minutes to dry on a 30 pounder dryer.

    Also, remember that in a FULL CYCLE DRYING there is only one cooldown in the whole cycle with several hot peaks and valleys and with one start-up from cool and not several starts from cool.

    This way you will save on utilities, your customers will know that whatever time Full Cycle you set-up your dryers, their load is going to be completely dry without the guesstimation and without continuously opening the door to touch if the clothes are dry already

    You should calculate your dryer TPDs by dividing the revenue by the number of days in the collection. Divide that result by the number of dryers.  Divide that result by $ 1.07 to get your dryer TPDs

    If you are charging $ 1.00 for 16 minutes drying vending price, that is $0.06 per minute times 32 minutes $ ± 2.133. or rounded to $ 2.00 for 32 minutes. So when I calculate Turns per Day on my 30 pounds stack dryers, I use this formula.

    Revenue divided by (÷) days divided by ÷ divided by (÷) number of 30 pounds stack dryers or pockets.

    Turns per day are the AVERAGE of a whole bunch of customers using the 30 pounds dryers during a period of days <normally 7 days or the same number of days in each period>

    Once you have a firm handle on your TPDs, you can begin playing with some "what if" calculations. You might ask yourself, "What if I raise the vend price on my 40 lb. washers from $4.50 to $5.00 and lose 5% of my 40 lb. customers for 6 months?"  To answer this question, you can now calculate your expected revenue using this formula:  Number of TPDs on 30 lb. washers minus 5% due to the expected decrease.  Then simply multiply the new TPDs X $5.00 X 7 days X number of 40 lb. washers to get an estimate of a weekly collection under these parameters.

    If price increases from $ 35 to $ 40 there is a 14.29% percentage

    The revenue from your dryers should be something like 35 to 50% of your washer´s revenue.



    ------------------------------
    Dr. Kienkara Jo Tekura

    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    Wei Chen,

    I like to calculate dryer TPDs based on a 30 minute dry cycle.  You can do this whether your laundromat is  QO, DCO or full cycle.  Here's an example of what I do in my DCO laundromat:

    1.  The price on my 35 lb. dryers is $1.00 for 15 minutes so I'm actually charging $2.00 for a 30 minute cycle.
    2.  Divide the total 35 lb. dryer sales by the number of days since the last collection.
    3.  Divide that figure by the number of 35 lb. dryers.
    4.  Divide that figure by the price for 30 minutes - $2.00.
    5.  The result is the 35 lb. dryer TPDs.

    Here's another example:

    1.  The price on my 30 lb. dryers  is $1.00 for 16 minutes so I'm actually charging $1.88 for a 30 minute cycle ($1.00/16X30).
    2.  Divide the total 30 lb. dryer sales by the number of days since the last collection.
    3.  Divide that figure by the number of 30 lb. dryers.
    4.  Divide that figure by the price for 30 minutes - $1.88.
    5.  The result is the 30 lb. dryer TPDs.

    Now, obviously, no customer ever pays $1.88 for a 30 minute cycle on my 30 lb. dryers.  People are actually buying either a 16 minute cycle for $1.00 or a 32 minute cycle for $2.00.  I don't know how many people are buying the 16 minute cycle and I don't know how many people are buying the 32 minute cycle ... nor do I care.

    The purpose of doing TPDs is to determine demand and usage of various types and sizes of equipment.  Establishing a 30 minute dry cycle makes dryer TPDs easier to understand and use when it's time to buy new dryers.

    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 8 days ago
    We average about 9 to 10 turns per day on the weekend's on 55 washers and 5 different size washers .

    ------------------------------
    Larry & Gail Vladimir
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Bakers Centre Laundry
    Levittown PA
    www.Bakerscentrelaundry.com
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 8 days ago
    Larry V,

    I agree that 10 TPDs on a busy weekend is possible.

    Looking at the ad in Planet Laundry magazine, it appears that you replaced all your 5 year old washers with new Huebsch washers. Is this correct?

    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 11 days ago
    Wei,
    My TPD for my dryers is the same calculation as my washers.

    1 cycle dry is 10 minutes, so 4(ish) TPD for my dryers means each dryer averages a shade over 40 minutes per day.

    I do not have free dry.

    I have a small store in a pretty competitive market.  Some competitors have free dry.

    Wondering what a good % of wash revenue would be good for dryer revenue...

    A typical week for me my dryer income to wash percentage is somewhere between 22 - 28%.  I might be in the 30% range, I'll start tracking this from now on.  Thanks.

    ------------------------------
    laurence singer
    Investor
    Lincolnwood IL
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 10 days ago
    I assumed you had a cycle for dryers.  We just are minutes per quarter.

    We run between 30-32% dryer revenue to washer revenue.  Went down a bit when we raised washer prices but left dryer prices alone.

    ------------------------------
    WEI CHEN
    Store Owner/ Employee

    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    What if 60% is not on Saturday and Sunday? Here is a real example from a relatively busy laundry. Every laundry is different.

    Day %
    SUNDAY 13.30 
    MONDAY 15.86 
    TUESDAY 14.18 
    WEDNESDAY 13.04 
    THURSDAY 13.25 
    FRIDAY 13.69 
    SATURDAY 16.69 
    Total: 100.00



    ------------------------------
    Barry Carter
    Distributor and Store Owner
    Asheville, NC
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 12 days ago
    Agreed, my busiest days are Mondays, and the beginning of the month.
    I also have a carwash which is busiest on a Friday afternoon.

    ------------------------------
    Adam Carson
    Owner/Operator
    Busy Bubbles LLC
    Port Orford, OR
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 11 days ago
    Greg brings up a great point.   There are already a lot of good CLA threads on TPD and when to hike prices when TPD gets too high.  I've seen recommendations on here that when you get to 5 TPD or higher a price hike should be considered.  But that is avg TPD not TPD on peak day of week.

    His question was how many TPD is a max (on any given day, in his example the peak) before customers leave due to crowding.  I don't know the answer.  Is there a rule of thumb on this?

    You don't have to be a card shop to know exact TPD on each machine on each day.  Very simple to collect daily.  I did this for months when I first took over to figure out what machines to replace, add, etc.  And still occasionally update to see if flow has changed.  My weekends are 60% revenue which matches his assumption.​

    ------------------------------
    R Anderson
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Camarillo CA
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 11 days ago

    R Anderson, you are absolutely correct.  I am trying to figure out at what capacity level a mat becomes to busy and you are losing customer as fast as you are gaining them (i.e. Capacity constraint vs a Customer acquisition constraint).  In your case if you are doing 60% of volume on weekend and average 4TPD (my SWAG) for the week then we can guess (based on table above) that on Sat and Sun you average 8.4 TPD.  I know there are a lot more variables that could impact this, but my general question is, when you look at your mat on a weekend do you think "I am at my limit, how do I get people to come on the weekday", or do you think "I have a lot of empty machines and could get a lot more people in here". 

     

    Maybe there is no real good way to answer this, but when a supplier tells me I should be able to average 4 to 5 TPD for a week or month, I have to think that on a busy day that means I would need to be doing 8 to 12 turns in a single day.  I just don't know if that is reasonable or not in the real world. 

     

    Thanks for all your input.



    ------------------------------
    Greg Smith
    Potential Investor
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 11 days ago
    Edited by Larry Adamski 11 days ago
    Greg,

    Your concern about how many TPDs a given laundromat can handle on its busiest day before customers come in, see the congestion and decide not to come back, is a valid one.  Unfortunately, it's also a concern that is hard to nail down because there are lots of variables at work.  Some variables include:

    1.  How good is the layout (floor plan) of the laundromat?  Are the aisles spacious or narrow?  Does it have adequate folding space?  Are there enough convenient parking spaces?
    2.  Is the laundromat high priced or low priced in comparison to the prevailing market pricing?  People will put up with more discomfort if they feel they're saving some money.
    3.  How comfortable is the laundromat (disregarding the crowd)?  Is it air conditioned in the summer and heated in the winter?  Is there enough comfortable seating?  Is the restroom clean and well equipped?
    4.  How good is the location of the laundromat?  Is it convenient to where the customers live?  Does it have easy access?
    5.  Does the laundromat have single pocket dryers that tend to spread customers apart or stacked dryers that tend to compress customers together?

    These and other variables will help determine how much inconvenience a customer might put up with in a busy laundromat.  So there is no hard and fast rule that any laundromat can handle X TPDs during a given time period before customers start to go elsewhere.  Each owner has to figure out for himself at what point he has reached the point of saturation and thus his opportunity for sales growth is limited.  It's at that point or prior to it that it makes a lot of sense to consider what the next price increase will look like and when it will take place.  A well-designed price increase will drive away the most price-conscience customers while replacing those lost sales with more profitable sales from the remaining customers.  This "Thinning the herd" approach reduces demand and substantially increases comfort for those good customers who stick with you.  It also makes the laundromat stronger and more viable.



    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 18.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 11 days ago
    Greg, here is an anecdotal report.  On a busy Sunday afternoon, my peak, nearly all washers will be running.  Regular customers show up and see that.  Instead of leaving, they reserve their spot by placing bag in front of running machine (which may have 15 min or so left).  Fortunately we have several shops next door (99 cent store, bakery, juice bar, etc.) they then visit to kill time.  Is easier than hauling everything back to the car and going to another busy mat.

     I sense something else.  There is also a social aspect of being at a busy mat.  I think a lot of the customers enjoy it (similar to a busy bar).  A lot of them are friends and see their friends washing and don't mind waiting.  Many conversations going on.  For me, I would rather visit an empty mat, but I am different than my customers.

    I am usually present during these peak hours.  It is EXTREMELY rare someone leaves due to the crowd.  When it does happen, I follow them out to the lot and offer them a free wash.  This happens a few times per year.

    I would still like to hear some opinions on max TPD (before you turn off customers) on peak day from the experts on here.  Is it 8, 10, 12, or higher?

    ------------------------------
    R Anderson
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Camarillo CA
    ------------------------------



  • 19.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 10 days ago
    Hi, Greg...

    The limiting factor at my store on busy days is the size of the parking lot. I have 22 parking spots plus curb-side, with 45 washers inside the store. Since washer/dryer combined run time for even the largest loads is less than 1 hour, I rarely have people waiting in line for machines.

    The folks who stay to fold take up parking spots for a longer period of time, preventing new entrants to the store. Maybe it's time to reduce the number of folding tables from 12 to 10.  ;)

    So, to answer your question, my washers and dryers can all handle at least 2 "turns" per hour, assuming people load quickly and empty the machines as soon as they stop. However, the best my parking spots can do is 1 turn per hour... even less than that if people stay to fold.

    Huh... maybe I should start a customer shuttle... The Bubbles' Bus !!!

    ------------------------------
    Ann Whitehead
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Bubbles Laundry
    Everett WA
    ------------------------------



  • 20.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 10 days ago
    Ann,

    When I bought the Muskegon Laundromat in 1986, it had only the south parking lot - just 10 parking spaces.  To make matters worse, the previous owner had sold a 20 year easement to the nearby Pizza Hut giving their customers the right to share those spaces that I would be buying.  Obviously, this came as no surprise to me since I researched the easements prior to completing the purchase.  I knew in advance that parking would be an issue and I began developing a Master Plan that included increasing the available parking prior to even closing on the laundromat.  The solution?  I built an entire north parking lot - 15 spaces, and added a north entrance to the laundromat.  I also built a west parking lot - 4 spaces, also close to the new north entrance.  The best part about these two new parking lots - no easements!  Well, the Pizza Hut's easement finally expired in 2005 so I now have control over all of my customer parking.

    I guess my point is that if your parking is holding you back, look for a solution to the problem.  Maybe you have property that could be turned into more parking.  Maybe you can buy a nearby property and turn it into a parking lot.  Just make sure the new parking is convenient to your entrances.

    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 21.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 9 days ago
     Oh, Larry…
    Back in 1999 I tried to do as you suggested when the apartment building next-door to my laundry burnt down. The owners cleared off all the debris, and then came to me and asked me if I wanted to buy the property. At that time, I did not have the cash on hand, so I went to my landlord and asked if now was the time for me to buy the Laundry building.

    My idea was to float a loan for the Laundry property, plus the vacant lot next-door (banks here do not loan on raw ground, hence the need to do both at once with the Laundry building in the middle.) Access from the new lot would have been through the front electric sliding doors (I have two sets of electric doors, north and west)

    My landlord was not yet ready to sell the building, and he wanted to carry the contract on the future loan. So the property was purchased by someone else who put up another apartment building. The units all have washer/dryer hookups.
    I figure I could've put in 12 more parking spots generating over $100,000 per year. It is now 2018... Every time I do the math, I weep.


    ------------------------------
    Ann Whitehead
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Bubbles Laundry
    Everett WA
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 9 days ago
    Ann,

    Don't beat yourself up over a lost opportunity.  You did your best.  Now just keep your eye open for another opportunity.

    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 8 days ago

    Ann, thanks for the input about parking, that's helpful.   The site I am working on will have 20 express washers (900Lbs) and two entrances with 25 to 31 parking spots (depending on how I lay out the lot).  I am hoping parking won't be my critical constraint but I haven't seen any good rules on number of parking spots needed per # of washer, just "more" parking is better.  LOL.  Also, I was planning on 9 to 11 folding tables. Do you think that is to many?  Can I have to many? With that number I still end up with minimum 6 foot isles everywhere and a good amount of seating.  So hopefully if the design and demographics are correct then my constraint will be the equipment.  Which I believe is where I want my final constraint.  Thanks….



    ------------------------------
    Greg Smith
    Potential Investor
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 8 days ago
    Greg,

    I like 1 parking space for every 2 washers and 1 table for every 3 dryer pockets.

    You're smart to properly balance your new laundromat. This minimizes construction costs and maximizes customer service.

    ------------------------------
    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 8 days ago
    Thanks Larry, that's a great rule of thumb for the parking and folding tables.

    ------------------------------
    Greg Smith
    Potential Investor
    ------------------------------



  • 26.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 4 days ago

    June 18, 2018     19:19 pm

    こんにちは Konnichiwa Hello Larry & Gail Vladimir,

    Your wording " We average about 9 to 10 turns per day on the weekend's on 55 washers and 5 different size washers. "

    The definition of AVERAGE is:

    1. A calculated "central" value of a set of numbers
    2. Average refers to the sum of numbers divided by "n". "N" also called the mean.
    3. Sums of data divided by the number of items in the data will give the mean average. The mean average is used quite regularly to determine final math marks over a term.
    4. In colloquial language, an average is a middle or typical number of a list of numbers. Different concepts of average are used in different contexts. Often "average" refers to the arithmetic mean, the sum of the numbers divided by how many numbers are being averaged. In statistics, mean, median, and mode are all known as measures of central tendency, and in colloquial usage sometimes any of these might be called an average value.

    e.g.

    1. Averages are often used in sports: batting averages which mean a number of hits to a number of times at bat.
    2. Gas mileage is determined by using averages.
    3. Turns Per Day on the weekend's, despite 55 washers and 5 different size washers.
    4.  

    In your wording: We average about 9 to 10 turns per day on the weekend's  " . . .

    Which one is the AVERAGE 9 OR 10?

    The average of 9 and 10 is 9.5 (9+10)÷ 2 = 9.5

    Your store opens 24 hours.

    What would be your average if you only were open from 6:00 am to 23:00 pm or 17 hours?

    (9.5 AVERAGE turns per day on the weekend's ÷ 24 hours) X (23:00 pm. – 6:00 am) = ± 6.73 AVERAGE turns per day on the weekend's

    An AVERAGE of 6.7 turns per day on the weekend's in some CLA surveys is the AVERAGE TURNS ON WEEKENDS. So your 6.7 average is in the AVERAGE range for most laundries surveyed.

    Can you break down for us your turns per day on the weekend's and weekdays from 24:00 pm to 6:00 am? I do not believe, and I hope I'm wrong that it's 6.7

    Is it worth to be open 24 hours with 55 washers (total pockets) and 5 different size washers and 72 total dryer pockets working at NG gas expensive 95,000 BTU's and 165,000 BTU´s at High 190 F.; Med 160 F.; and low 140 F. tempeartures.

    Your dryer to washer is1.309 ratio

    Would not it be more sensible / practical / functional to operate with 25 washer pockets and 33 FREE dryer pockets <the same 1.309 ratio> one weekend and the next weekend with the rest / half  of the equipment?

    Could you illustrate us with your break down for each one of your 24 hours open store and your 7 days week?

    These charts are my AVERAGE Turns per hour and per day from 7:30 am to 21:00 pm <13.5 working hours per day> from Sunday to Saturday



    ------------------------------
    Dr. Kienkara Jo Tekura

    ------------------------------



  • 27.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 3 days ago
    Kienkara,

    I find your charts and observations to be interesting.  Your suggestion of shutting down half of the laundromat during the late evening hours hit home for me.  A long time ago, I designed some laundromats so that they could run effectively with one side open (40% of the facility) or the other side open (60% of the facility) or with both sides open (100% of the facility).  This kind of design enhances operating efficiency while spreading demand on equipment more evenly.  Thus, equipment ages better.  In addition, the closed side can be thoroughly cleaned during the slow time when the other side is open for business.  Certainly, any 24 hour laundromat could benefit from such an innovative design.

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    Larry Adamski
    Muskegon Laundromat
    Spring Lake MI
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  • 28.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 3 days ago
    Hi, Greg...

    City Code where I'm located requires a laundromat to have a minimum of one parking spot for every 2.5 washers.

    However, I agree with Larry that at least one parking spot for every two washers would be more favorable to your store. On busy days/times when people are off work and have time for laundry, it seems you can never have enough parking!

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    Ann Whitehead
    Store Owner/ Employee
    Bubbles Laundry
    Everett WA
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  • 29.  RE: How many Turns on Weekend?

    Posted 3 days ago
    Thank you Ann and everyone else for the input and detailed examples.  It has all been very helpful!

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    Greg Smith
    Potential Investor
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